Frost Advisory #422 – Increase Your Ratings 30% Guaranteed, Without Diet Or Exercise!

What if I told you that you can increase your ratings 30% overnight?  Admit it.  You’d probably be curious, just like when Marie Osmond says she’s lost 50 pounds without exercise AND she eats chocolate cake every day!

People are drawn to black and white opinions because they are simple, not because they are true.  Truth demands serious effort and thought.”

Donald Miller

Actually, you might increase your ratings 30% overnight, but it’s not because of some magic pill or trick.  It’s because Nielsen is changing they way they tabulate when you plug the gizmo in the thingamajig.

Continue reading

Tommy Kramer Coaching Tip #266 – Throw Me Into The Pool

If you’re having trouble getting into Content, well, don’t feel like the Lone Ranger.  Every air talent either struggles with this at some point, or worse, doesn’t know yet that they’re struggling with it. : (

There’s lots of coaching available on this, including my own.  We’ve all heard the “Headline first, then tell the rest of the story” thing, for example.  And there’s tons of stuff about how to construct a story, how to physically lay out a story in just bullet points, etc., and what a great ending should be.

But here’s the problem:  You don’t really know until you know.  Human beings may become aware of things and intellectually understand them through reading and talking with people about them, but in the long run, we really only learn through experience – trial and error.

Continue reading

Tommy Kramer Coaching Tip #265 – Prep Tip: The 3 Questions

Here’s one of my primary tips for show prep – The 3 Questions.  If you’ve read my “The 5 Subjects” tip, you already know the five categories of Content that will ALWAYS work (besides the obvious “station things” that will always be in the mix, like promoting events or features, etc.).

But “The 5 Subjects” should be filtered through these three questions before you put them on the air:

Continue reading

Frost Advisory #420 – Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

“Kindness seems like such a radical idea today.”

As negativity, finger pointing, and spit wad throwing reach new levels in politics, and in traditional and social media, we can sense a growing desire for a breath of fresh air.

Just this week Bloomberg news reported, “Freaked Out Americans Desperately Seek to Escape the News.”

I know people who have turned off certain TV cable news channels (me, included).  I know radio stations that have turned off the TV news in their studio due to incessant negativity and turned on HGTV.

The movie “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” is a smash hit, bringing in $4.1 million in just three weeks.

Director Morgan Neville said, “Mr. Rogers tried to teach us how to behave in a community and a society together, and the value of civility and the value of honoring this relationship with each other.

And we live in times that don’t honor that at all.”

If you think your radio station is only about songs and deejays and unfamiliar music, you’ll never understand how to connect with what people are feeling today.

Fred Rogers was a man who believed in inherent goodness and preached the idea that everyone was special, just the way they are.

Jenelle Riley, Variety

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” is “a much-needed emotional tonic for troubled times.

Sounds like a good idea for a radio station, too.

Tommy Kramer Coaching Tip #264 – Don’t “Present it;” Just Do It

Dan Ingram died a few days ago.  If you’re not familiar with him, suffice it to say that to a ton of people, he was the Michael Jordan of radio.  Primarily known for his work in New York on WABC and WCBS, maybe this Wikipedia quote says it best:

Ingram was one of the most highly regarded DJs from his era.  He was noted for his quick wit and ability to convey a humorous or satiric idea with quick pacing and an economy of words, a skill which rendered him uniquely suited to, and successful within, modern personality-driven music radio.

Yes, the style was a little different then, but he was FUN, and you never knew what he’d say next.  So with Dan Ingram in mind…

Continue reading

Frost Advisory #419 – Let Me Speak To The Manager

The call comes in.  “Let me speak to the manager!”  There is only one thing this conversation can be about.

Someone isn’t happy.

As I became interested in broadcasting as a teenager I became hooked on a local Dallas TV show called, “Let Me Speak to the Manager,” a behind the scenes look at how TV was  programmed.

The show was unique in that it actually aired complaints from viewers, unheard of back in the day.  They even discussed stuff that aired on the other TV stations and networks.  Egad!

In fact, I can remember being told NOT to talk about ANYTHING on TV (you know like the presidential election, World Series, or Super Bowl) for fear that our listeners would turn off the radio that very moment and turn on their TV.  I’M NOT MAKING THIS UP, as Dave Barry would say.

In my travels I run across many different kinds of programmers, managers, and air talent.

Some have many years of experience; others have one year of experience many times.

Continue reading

Tommy Kramer Coaching Tip #263 – Be A Good Disc Jockey, Too

A lot of air talents are not even aware of talent coaching.  They have aircheck sessions with the PD – maybe – and that’s about it.  I don’t know every talent coach working these days, but most of the ones I do know concentrate on Content – the search for it, the storytelling skill set, how to dig inside yourself and reveal things that (hopefully) the listener can identify with.

And that’s fine.  That’s the “big picture stuff,” and it matters.  If you’re fortunate enough to work with a Valerie Geller or Randy Lane, for instance, there’s no doubt that you will get better, and understand a lot of things you probably never “got” before.

But there’s something else that plays a huge factor in being the Full Package, and that’s simply being a good disc jockey.

Continue reading

Frost Advisory #418 – A (Bad) Programming Lesson From The Wacky Sports Fan!

He’s a bum!

Why didn’t he take out the pitcher?

This guy can’t hit!

Why didn’t he leave the pitcher in?

Bunt!  Bunt!

Steal!  Steal!

Swing!  Swing!

The wacky sports fan always knows what his team shoulda done!  The Monday morning quarterback is always right.  It helps when you know the outcome of the game on Sunday.

Read the blog comments after a 4-game losing streak.  Ouch!

Read the blogs after a 10-game losing streak!  Ouch!  Ouch!

“Every time we lose a game I’ve either left the pitcher in too long or taken him out too early.”

Whitey Herzog

A wacky sports fan always values the recent over the long term.  They comment on THAT at bat, THAT bad pitch, THAT bumble by the fielder.

I reckon’ we can expect that kind of second guessing from the bleachers, but it is far more serious when it comes from the programmer or manager’s office.
Continue reading

Tommy Kramer Coaching Tip #262 — The Main Difference Between Facebook And Radio

With all the conversations going on in radio circles about the uses of social media, there’s a giant, Grand Canyon-sized difference being overlooked.  Let’s just use Facebook as the best example, simply because it’s the most-utilized social media platform.

As of this writing, there are about 225 million people in the United States using Facebook.

But there are over 323 million people in this country, and well over 90% of them listen to radio for a significant amount of time every single day.  So radio has somewhere between sixty-five to ninety million more people using it every single day than Facebook does.

I’ve talked a lot about how random postings on Facebook don’t make for compelling radio Content; quite the opposite, usually.  And this is why: because they’re used in totally different ways.

Continue reading